Kuto was born in a small village in North Macedonia. He was the youngest of three children and his parents were poor farmers. When Kuto was five years old, his family moved to the city of Skopje. His father got a job as a janitor at a local hospital and his mother worked as a maid. Kuto went to school and did well, but he was always getting into trouble because he loved to play pranks on his classmates. When he was ten years old, Kuto’s family moved again, this time to the United States. They settled in New York City and Kuto’s father got a job as a taxi driver. Kuto attended public schools in New York and continued to play tricks on his classmates. He also started exploring the city on his own and found that he loved going to museums, art galleries, and concerts.

When Kuto turned eighteen, he left home and struck out on his own. He changed his name (he had always hated being called “Krsto,” which is what everyone called him) and started working odd jobs while he tried to figure out what he wanted to do with his life. Eventually, Kuto realized that he wanted to be an artist like some of the people he had met in New York City’s art scene. He started taking classes at an art school and slowly began making a name for himself as an up-and-coming artist . . .