Kuto was born in a small village in Uruguay. He was the youngest of four children and his parents were very poor. When Kuto was five years old, his father died of a sudden illness and his mother had to take care of the family on her own. Kuto’s older siblings often teased him and made fun of him because he was different from them. They would call him names like “kutito” (little Kuto) or “the little black sheep.”

As he grew up, Kuto began to realize that he didn’t fit in with his family or with the other villagers. He wasn’t interested in the same things as they were and he didn’t share their values. The more different he felt, the more isolated he became.

One day, when Kuto was sixteen years old, he decided to leave Uruguay and try to make a new life for himself somewhere else. He sold everything he owned and bought a one-way ticket to America.

When Kuto arrived in New York City, he didn’t know anyone and had no idea what to do next. He wandered around aimlessly for days until finally someone took pity on him and offered him a job as a janitor in an office building downtown. It wasn’t much money but it was enough to keep him alive.